Biology (Macroscopic )

sucrose Sucrose

candyMolecules of sucrose tore apart in their bellies letting glucose course free in their ... Read more
This month's cover of The Scientist has a mistake that makes me cringe. Can you spot what's wrong?
i-1ed179c436a8573ded8cb468de9e1205-Jan_finches.jpg
And they call themselves "The Scientist" humph!Read more
We always enjoy home science experiments and it was fun the other night to learn about a new experiment we could try with our teenage daughter and an iPhone. As it turned out, the joke was on us. My husband is an enthusiastic fan of the iPhone store. Last night, he downloaded this application called "Army Knife." This application has, I kid you not, the following nine items:
  • unit converter - these are always helpful, especially if you travel
  • ultrasonic whistle
  • protractor
  • Heart (beats per minute) counter
  • measuring tape
  • ... Read more

"Digital biology," as I use the phrase, refers to the idea of using digital information for doing biology. This digital information comes from multiple sources such as DNA sequences, protein sequences, DNA hybridization, molecular structures, analytical chemistry, biomarkers, images, GIS, and more. We obtain this information either from experiments or from a wide variety of databases and we work with this information using several kinds of bioinformatics tools.

The reason I'm calling this field "digital biology" and not "bioinformatics" (even though I typically use the terms ... Read more

I suppose I should have expected this. I thought it might be fun to see what the databases had to say about turkeys. So, I queried the NCBI databases, found a taxonomy reference, and started clicking related links to see pictures of the different species. Why? Because it would be great to see what the different species of turkies look like and compare them. Here's a species of wild turkey that I didn't expect to find.
A loose spider on a space station.i-ec84d970daaf341cdddd48f6934c5524-DSC_7744.jpg Apparently the missing orb-weaver spider is gone from it's cage and can't be found anywhere. And for the record, I don't know what kind of spider is in my photograph. It's a spider that lives in Fairbanks, AK. From the Telegraph:
It was hoped the missing spider might have ... Read more
Yes, that's right, another Medicine 2.0 blog carnival has been posted for your enjoyment. And the host, Ivor Kovic, has done an amazingly creative and interesting thing with images from all the past hosting places..., and well, you just need to go see it yourself. Read more
I used to get e-mails from relatives that were filled with cute pictures of kittens and puppies. It's luck they didn't know about this site: http://www.zooborns.com/ These are the some of the absolutely cutest baby pictures I have ever seen! I hear Raffi songs in my head when I look at these (can you sing Baby Beluga ... Read more
The Galápagos islands rank high on my list of places that I really, really, really want to visit. But for many reasons, it's always looked like a trip to the Galápagos would be at least a decade or two away. Now, I'll be able to go in January and so will all of you. Thanks to the University of Cincinnati, we'll be able to follow in Darwin's historic steps, and experience some of his amazing journey. The only difference is we'll do this trip as avatars in Second Life. The University is stocking this ... Read more
Then you need to head over to The Oyster's Garter and read Miriam Goldstein's incredibly funny post about the problems of male sea squirts. Apparently, if you're a sea squirt, the size of your sperm is related to your environment and mostly the number of other sea squirts in your environment. Usually, I'm not attuned to the issues of broadcasting spawn or the lives of those who live under a dock, but Ms. Goldstein channels ... Read more

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